Experimental Treatment and Muscular Dystrophy Cambridge MA

Injecting a therapeutic molecule into muscle appears to jump-start the production of a crucial protein that's missing in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, British researchers report. The treatment so far is only applicable to about 13 percent of people with the debilitating and ultimately fatal disease, but scientists are hopeful that similar molecules might expand the treatment to a wider range of patients.

Harvard Square Eyecare- Porter Square
(857) 588-0477
18 White Street
Cambridge, MA

Data Provided by:
Harvard Square Eyecare
(857) 588-0490
19 Dunster Street
Cambridge, MA

Data Provided by:
George Mandler CNS DiplOM LDN LicAc
(617) 913-5970
21 Belmont St
Cambridge, MA
Business
Nourishing Balance
Specialties
Acupuncture, Clinical Nutrition, in-depth individualized nutritional assessment, Japanese Kiiko style acupuncture, moxabustion, cupping, TuiNa, Shiatsu
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield
Workmens Comp Accepted: Yes
Accepts Uninsured Patients: Yes

Doctor Information
Medical School: New England School of Acupuncture, 2006
Additional Information
Member Organizations: American Association of Oriental Medicine American Dietetic Association Oriental Medicine Association of Massachusetts American College of Nutrition


Data Provided by:
Boston Cat Hospital
(617) 266-7877
665 Beacon St
Boston, MA

Data Provided by:
Recreation Chiropractic
(617) 678-7888
224 Clarendon Street Suite 32
Boston, MA

Data Provided by:
Korb & Associates
(857) 288-5905
400 Commonwealth Ave # 2
Boston, MA

Data Provided by:
Patrick Doody D.C.
(617) 441-0101
15 Story Street
Cambridge, MA
Business
Harvard Square Chiropractic
Specialties
Chiropractic, massage therapy, acupuncture
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: Yes
Workmens Comp Accepted: Yes
Accepts Uninsured Patients: Yes
Emergency Care: Yes

Doctor Information
Medical School: New York Chiropractic College, 2002
Additional Information
Member Organizations: American Chiropractic Association, Massachusetts Chiropractic Society, Harvard Square Business Association


Data Provided by:
Ida Gorenburg, MD
(617) 661-5100
1611 Cambridge St
Cambridge, MA
Business
Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates Internal
Specialties
Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Boston Copley Square Chiropractic - Boston
(617) 206-9933
304 Columbus Ave
Boston, MA

Data Provided by:
Arthur L Day, MD
(617) 732-6810
45 Francis St
Boston, MA
Business
Brigham & Women's Hospital Neurosurgery
Specialties
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Experimental Treatment and Muscular Dystrophy

Provided By:

TUESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Injecting a therapeutic molecule into muscle appears to jump-start the production of a crucial protein that's missing in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, British researchers report.

The treatment so far is only applicable to about 13 percent of people with the debilitating and ultimately fatal disease, but scientists are hopeful that similar molecules might expand the treatment to a wider range of patients.

Duchenne muscular dystrophy affects about one in 3,500 males, and involves a progressive wasting of muscle due to a genetic inability to produce the protein dystrophin, a key component of muscle structure. No treatments are available for the illness, and most of those affected die by age 30.

Recently, molecules called antisense oligonucleotides have shown some promise. These molecules work by "skipping over" portions of the defective gene that would otherwise block dystrophin production.

In their study, published online Aug. 25 in The Lancet Neurology, researchers at the University College London Institute of Child Health selected seven patients for whom a particular oligonucleotide molecule, called AVI-4658, appeared suitable. In these patients, the molecule "skipped" exon 51 -- the portion of the dystrophin-blocking gene that appeared to get in the way of effective dystrophin production.

Injecting the molecule into the muscles of these seven patients resulted in increased dystrophin production in all treated muscles, according to a journal news release. "Intramuscular AVI-4658 was safe and induced the expression of dystrophin locally within treated muscles," the team wrote. "On the basis of these observations, we have initiated a dose-ranging study to assess the safety and efficacy of repeated doses of systemic intravenous AVI-4658."

In a commentary, Annemieke Aartsma-Rus and Gert-Jan van Ommen, from Leiden, the Netherlands, noted that while only about 13 percent of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients can be expected to be helped by AVI-4658, molecules that skip other exons on the gene could be used, potentially spreading the benefit to more than 70 percent of patients.

More information

Find out more about Duchenne muscular dystrophy at the Muscular Dystrophy Association.

SOURCE: The Lancet Neurology, news release, Aug. 25, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com