» » »

Heart Risk Tied to Inflammatory Protein Boston MA

Researchers are linking levels of a protein that indicates tissue inflammation in the body to future risk of heart attack, stroke, cancer and chronic lung disease. But the association may be the result of other risk factors related to heart disease, such as smoking, rather than the protein itself, researchers said.

David E Schwartz, MD
(978) 927-4110
77 Herrick St
Beverly, MA
Business
The Medical Group Inc
Specialties
Cardiology

Data Provided by:
Christopher J O Donnell
(617) 726-0995
55 Fruit St
Boston, MA
Specialty
Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Andrew R Weintraub
(617) 636-5000
750 Washington St
Boston, MA
Specialty
Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Noyan A Gokce
(617) 638-7490
732 Harrison Ave
Boston, MA
Specialty
Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Judy Wie-ming Hung
(617) 726-0995
55 Fruit St
Boston, MA
Specialty
Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Roman William De Sanctis, MD
(617) 726-2889
55 Fruit St
Boston, MA
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Harvard Med Sch, Boston Ma 02115
Graduation Year: 1955
Hospital
Hospital: Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Boston, Ma
Group Practice: Cardiac Unit Associates At Massachusetts General Hospital

Data Provided by:
Danya Dinwoodey, MD
(617) 638-8700
88 E Newton St
Boston, MA
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Herbert J LeVine
(617) 636-5911
750 Washington St
Boston, MA
Specialty
Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Michael D Klein
(617) 638-7490
732 Harrison Ave
Boston, MA
Specialty
Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Marc Jay Semigran
(617) 724-6750
55 Fruit St
Boston, MA
Specialty
Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Heart Risk Tied to Inflammatory Protein

Provided By:

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers are linking levels of a protein that indicates tissue inflammation in the body to future risk of heart attack, stroke, cancer and chronic lung disease.

But the association may be the result of other risk factors related to heart disease, such as smoking, rather than the protein itself, researchers said.

The molecule, known as C-reactive protein (CRP), is produced by the liver and indicates that tissues are inflamed because of injury. Some research has suggested that CRP levels might be as important a cause of heart attacks as cholesterol in the blood.

In a new study released this week, researchers led by John Danesh of the University of Cambridge looked over findings from 54 research projects that analyzed more than 160,000 people in 18 countries.

The researchers report that other factors -- such as smoking, obesity and cholesterol levels better explain links between CRP and heart disease.

More research is needed, they write, partly "to assess whether evidence of low-grade inflammation mainly indicates external triggers (e.g., socioeconomic position or infection), insulin resistance, hereditary predisposition, or some combination of such factors."

The study was published Dec. 22 in The Lancet.

More information

Learn more about heart disease from the CDC.

SOURCE: The Lancet, news release, Dec. 21, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com