Pest/Termite Inspections Boston MA

One of the myriad steps in a real estate closing process is a Pest/Termite Inspection. After a purchase agreement has been signed, the escrow agent will normally order a standard termite inspection in order to allow time for any problems to be repaired before the transaction is closed. Make sure you opt for a termite inspection before you decide to buy a home in Boston.

Beacon Communities LLC
(617) 574-1100
150 Federal Street, 5th Floor
Boston, MA
 
Gti Properties
(617) 451-2436
443 Albany St
Boston, MA

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Jebb and Driggin Realty, Inc
321 Columbus Avenue
Boston, MA

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Capital Realty
(617) 427-1022
801 Tremont St
Boston, MA

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Marsh Properties, Inc.
(617) 716-0240
306 Dartmouth Street
Boston, AK
 
The Barry Group
(617) 227-2110
98 West Cedar Street
Boston , AK
 
Iron Mountain, Inc.
(617) 535-8500
745 Atlantic Avenue
Boston, MA
 
Boston Realty Net
(617) 267-2340
247 Newbury St
Boston, MA
 
Ballast Realty Group Llc
(617) 426-0075
1200 Washington St
Boston, MA

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Keating & Co
(617) 227-8970
66 Beacon St
Boston, MA

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Pest/Termite Inspections

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  • Ordered by escrow agent as part of closing process
  • Necessary for loan approval in many states
  • Conducted by state-licensed official
  • Entire structure is examined for signs of termites
  • Inspector also looks for signs of mold or decay
  • Inspector will then file a written report with escrow agent
  • Usually costs $75 to $500
  • Buyer normally pays for inspection as part of closing costs
  • Seller normally pays to repair any damage found
  • Buyers should make sure to have a contingency clause allowing them to back out of purchasing should extensive damage be found
  • Homeowner’s insurance does not cover termite damage

    One of the myriad steps in a real estate closing process is a Pest/Termite Inspection. After a purchase agreement has been signed, the escrow agent will normally order a standard termite inspection in order to allow time for any problems to be repaired before the transaction is closed. An inspection is required by lenders before they will approve a loan.

    Each state licenses a number of people to conduct termite inspections. These people are trained to inspect structures for signs of termite infestation and damage. This inspection usually begins with an examination of the basement, foundation, and exterior of the house to insure that no wooden parts of the structure are in contact with the soil underneath. Evidence of termites includes such elements as droppings, wood damage, cellulose shavings around the foundation, termite tubes, and tunnels in wooden beams. In addition to termite damage, inspectors will also look for mold, fungus, decaying wood, dry rot, puddling water, and leaks.

    Whether the inspector finds any damage or not, he/she will file a written report with the escrow agent who ordered the inspection detailing what was observed during the inspection. This report is normally completed within five to seven business days and becomes open to the public after two years through the state inspection board, which also receives a copy from the inspector. Any repair work deemed necessary by the inspector will also be detailed in the report along with the expected costs for such work, as well as recommendations for the prevention of any future problems. If there are problems with your property, it may help to take a walk-through with the inspector to help answer any questions you have about damage and repair.

    Any work recommended by the inspector cannot begin until the seller authorizes it. The escrow file number will be included on the report for easy access to the information within.

    Standard termite inspections will usually set you back between $75 and $500. The exact price is dependent on the age and size of structure being examined. Prices for any repair work will of course depend on the extent of the damage and what kind of work is done. The cost of the inspection itself is normally covered by the buyer as part of his/her closing costs. Barring the negotiation of a different agreement prior to the opening of escrow, the seller pays for any repair work.

    Homeowner’s insurance does not cover damage from termites. Talk to your inspector about their own warranty coverage and if any errors or emissions are covered.

    You can also order a total home inspection by a building contractor to examine the structure of the building and its mechanical systems, which costs more than just a termite inspection, but also alleviates fears of future problems.

    TIP FOR BUYERS: Include a contingency clause in your purchase agreement which allows you to renege on the purchase if the property has suffered serious damage from termites.

    TIP FOR SELLERS: Have your property inspected before you put it up for sale to avoid any problems after escrow has opened, as escrow is a stressful time, even without any termite problems. Keep any paperwork from past inspections to show potential buyers in order to alleviate any fears they might have.

    Visit Homesalesnetwork.com for more information