Pet Care FAQs Cambridge MA

Make sure that you really have the time for a pet. This also a significant reason why animals are abandoned - people find they just don't have the time. Cats are more independent and easier to leave alone for long periods of time but still they need daily play time and affection. Puppies and re-homed dogs do not do well left alone for more than a couple ofhours.

Lilly and Abbie Custom Dog Bed
(781) 665-8331
63 Lovell Road
Melrose, MA
Products
collar or pet CArrier choosing from over 150+ fabrics. There are 7 different size beds available and they CAn be either polyester fill or green fill. The covers are removable for easy laundering. Please check us out."

Sniff Dawg
(508) 653-7387
11 South Main Street (Rt 27)
Sherborn, MA
Products
we're smack dab in the middle of a very heavily dog populated area so we've heard it all- whatever you're looking for we most likely have it
Hours
CAn easily get it

PETCO
(617) 277-1592
226 Harvard Avenue
Allston, MA
Hours
Monday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Tuesday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Wednesday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Thursday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Friday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Saturday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Sunday: 10:00am-7:00pm

PETCO
(617) 254-8800
304 Western Avenue
Brighton, MA
Hours
Monday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Tuesday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Wednesday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Thursday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Friday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Saturday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Sunday: 10:00am-7:00pm

PETCO
(781) 483-3031
1406 Massachusetts Avenue
Arlington, MA
Hours
Monday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Tuesday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Wednesday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Thursday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Friday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Saturday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Sunday: 10:00am-7:00pm

Dr. Dog - BioChemics
(978) 750-0090
99 Rosewood Dr. #260
Danvers, MA

Data Provided by:
PETCO
(617) 868-3474
119 First Street
Cambridge, MA
Hours
Monday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Tuesday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Wednesday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Thursday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Friday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Saturday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Sunday: 10:00am-8:00pm

PetSmart
(617) 349-3481
160 Alewife Brook Parkway
Cambridge, MA
Hours
Monday - Friday: 9:00-9:00
Sunday: 10:00-6:00

PetSmart
(617) 387-2568
5 Mystic View Rd
Everett, MA
Hours
Monday - Friday: 9:00-9:00
Sunday: 10:00-6:00

PETCO
(781) 736-0200
75 Linden Street
Waltham, MA
Hours
Monday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Tuesday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Wednesday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Thursday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Friday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Saturday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Sunday: 10:00am-7:00pm

Data Provided by:

Pet Care FAQs

Colleen answers questions posed by readers

What are the main essential things to consider when looking for a new pet to bring home?

Do your homework. Always choose a breed of cat or dog that is within the limits of your ability to care for their physical characteristics (such as coat, teeth and diet) whilemaking great consideration for their exercise requirements. Most dogs in shelters are there because they're energy level was mismatched with their owner's and thus, resulted in behavior issues that the owner was unable to manage.

Make sure that you really have the time for a pet. This also a significant reason why animals are abandoned - people find they just don't have the time. Cats are more independent and easier to leave alone for long periods of time but still they need daily play time and affection. Puppies and re-homed dogs do not do well left alone for more than a couple ofhours. If you work full time, plan to have the financial resources to hire a dog walker or a doggy daycare, so your pooch gets the right amount of attention, exercise and socialization.

Be financially prepared. Just like children, animals can become ill and it can cost thousands to save their lives. If a pet becomes ill or is diagnosed with a disease, it can cost several hundred dollars a month for food and medication...sometimes for the rest of their lives.

Always rescue an animal. Shelters all across the nation are overcrowded with wonderful animals that only have a day left to live. Even if a prospective pet parent is really set on particular breed, theycan find that breed from a pure breed rescue.If you do choose to buy your next pet, never buy from a pet store and never meet a breeder to exchange money anywhere other than where the animal resides so you can witness first hand what kind of environment they are living in. If the breeder asks to meet you in a mall parking lot or similar place, or offers to bring the animal to you - this is a sure sign of a "backyard breeder". Most of these animalshave poor health and have been neglected, abusedand under socialized.

What are the basic things that one can do to prepare a home for the arrival for a pet? Which are most important?

Get down to ground level and remove potential risks such as small chewable items, plants, electric cords and grates where a pet could get a foot or leg stuck.

For dogs, buying a crate is essential.Dogs like to den in small dark spaces and this will give your new dog a place to retreat to if he becomes stressed and overwhelmed. Remove the door(so it can't get closed by accident) and cover it with a dark blanket on all three sides, leaving only the front open. Place the crate in aroom where the dog will be near you most. A second one in the bedroom or a guest room would be ideal, in case he wants peace and quiet away from guests and other family members or pets.

For cats, a tall carpeted kitty condo with some fresh catnip (catnip for adult cats only) will make even the scardiest of scaredy cats feel at home. Your newcat or kitten will be happy to hide and play inside the dark spaces ofa kitty condo. It's a great tool to fill all needs ofa new feline friend. Also, to avoid potty issues, always have two litterboxes per cat in each household and clean it as soon as possible after being soiled. Cats are very sensitive to dirty litterboxes (wouldn't you be?) and may start to potty on your carpet -which quickly becomes a hard habit to break.

Should special care be taken when welcoming a pet into a home that already has existing pets?

Yes, for dogs, the best thing to do is introduce the dogs on common ground away from the house or neighborhood. This way your existing dog won't have a reason to be protective, territorial and unfriendly. A male and female combo close in age is often the best mix. Give them a chance to sniff and play in an off-leash setting if possible. Even a doggy daycare would be a great place. Bring them home together, removingall toys and treats (prior to the homecoming) for at least a week, encouraging lots of walks and outdoor play between the dogs. Always feed your existing dog meals and treats first. Keeping the hierarchy in the home is of the utmost importance. Also, making a special feeding spot for each dog is imperative. A dog on each side of the room is ideal.

Cats can be more territorial than dogs as they don't require social interaction they way most dogs do. Preparation is the key to this relationship. Keepthe catsseparated for a few days. A baby gate in the doorway of a room where your resident cat does not frequent, including akitty condo to hide in, will be ideal forthe new cat.Preventing a problem is always easier than solving one. Your cat will hiss, posture and moan if he's not happy with the new guest. Often if he had little to social interaction with his littermates as a kitten, or has had no experience with other cats - this may happen. The best choice in adding a new cat to the household would be that of a smaller, younger cat and one of the opposite sex. T he visual impression of a smaller cat will seem less of a challenge or threat to the resident cat. Personality traits should also be similar so that playtime will be truly engaging and enjoyable.

Is it harder for older pets to adjust to a new household/environment than puppies/kittens?

Yes, because they're used to being somewhere else and don't understand why they have been displaced. Older animals also grieve for people and other pets they lived with and loved. Patience and compassion are of the utmost importance when bringing an older pet into the home. Puppies and kittens are curious and don't have many memory receptors built yet. Every second is new and exciting. Homes with rambunctious, younger pets are not a good match for older pets and may result in the older petfighting with the younger one out of frustration. Older pets are best paired with other pets of the same breed and age. The opposite sex is always a better match too.

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